Quick-and-dirty SMTP Server For Debugging

2013-12-27 11:51

Every computer program expands until it can read e-mail – or so they say. But many applications need not to read, but to send e-mails; web apps or web services are probably the most prominent examples. If you happen to develop them, you may sometimes want a local, dummy SMTP server just for testing this functionality. It doesn’t even have to send anything (it must not, actually), but it should allow you to see what would be sent if the app worked in a production environment.

By far the easiest way to setup such a server involves, quite surprisingly, Python. There is a standard library module called smtpd, which is built exactly for this purpose. Amusingly, you don’t even have to write any code that uses it; you can invoke it straight from the command line:

  1. $ python -m smtpd -n -c DebuggingServer

This will start a server that listens on port 8025 and dumps every message “sent” through it to the standard output. A custom port is chosen because on *nix systems, only the ports above 1024 are accessible to an ordinary user. For the standard SMTP port 25, you need to start the server as root:

  1. $ sudo python -m stmpd -c DebuggingServer localhost:25

While it’s more typing, it frees you from having to change the SMTP port number inside your application’s code.

If you plan to use smtpd more extensively, though, you may want to look at the small runner script I’ve prepared. By default, it tries to listen on port 25, but you can supply a port number as its sole argument.

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Author: Xion, posted under Applications, Internet, Programming »



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